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TABLE SAW BASIC CUTS
Introduction
Setup and Features
Saw Blades
Special Table Inserts
Table Saw Safety
Blade Projection
Table Saw Speeds
Crosscutting
Ripping

 

Ripping

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Figure 2-35. To set up for ripping, use the quill feed to make fine adjustments in the distance from the saw blade to the rip fence. Measure from the fence to the tip of a saw tooth that's set toward the fence. Click on image for larger view.

Ripping is cutting parallel to or with the grain of the wood. It's also known as cutting to width.

General Ripping
Mount the proper saw blade. Before turning on the machine check that the saw guards are in place, adjust the table height, and make a five-point check. All five locks--power plant, carriage, table height, table tilt, and quill--should be secure.

When ripping, use the rip fence to help guide the wood. Mount the rip fence to the table, slide the rip fence so that it's the desired distance away from the saw blade, then lock it in place. Use the quill feed to make fine adjustments (Figure 2-35). Be sure to measure from the fence to the tip of a tooth that's set toward the fence. When properly aligned, the rip fence automatically sets itself parallel to the saw blade. However, on critical setups, it's wise to check this. Measure the distance from the rip fence to the saw blade at both the front and back of the machine. Mount a feather board in front of the blade to help hold the stock against the fence.

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Figure 2-36. The rip fence gauges the cut width and acts as a control throughout the pass. Hands are placed so they can't come close to the cut area.

Stand in front of the Mark V, on the opposite side of the blade than the rip fence. (This position will help you keep the stock pressed against the fence as you rip it.) Turn on the Mark V, turn the speed dial to the proper speed, and let the saw come up to speed. Place the stock on the table and against the rip fence. Slowly feed the stock into the blade while keeping it pressed firmly against the rip fence (Figure 2-36). Don't force the cut or go any faster than the blade can cut. Warning: As you finish the cut, use a push stick or push block to help feed the last portion of the stock past the blade (Figure 2-37). This will keep your hands and fingers out of danger. When the cut is complete, turn off the machine and let it come to a complete stop before removingthe stock or any scraps.

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Figure 2-37. As you finish the rip cut, use a (A) push stick or (B) push block to help feed the last portion of the stock. Click on image to see larger view.

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Figure 2-38. When ripping narrow stock, use a fence straddler to help finish the cut.

Ripping Narrow Stock

When ripping narrow stock--1-1/2" to 3" wide--use the fence straddler to finish the cut (Figure 2-38). When ripping stock less than higher than the thickness of the stock (Figure 2-39) and screw it to the rip fence so that the fence doesn't interfere with the saw guard or the stock being cut. Use a similar size piece of scrap stock to push the good stock past the blade (Figure 2-40). Caution: Do not use the plastic push stick from the safety kit. When the good stock is clear of the blade, turn off the Mark V. Hold the scrap push stick steady until the blade comes to a complete stop, then move it away from the blade. To keep small pieces of stock from falling through the table insert, move the blade close to the insert on the side of the blade where the stock is being cut, or use a special table insert. The construction details for the special table inserts are shown in Figure 2-11.

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Figure 2-39. Construction details of a spacing fixture that is used when ripping stock less than 1-1/2" wide. Click on image for larger view.

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Figure 2-40. Clamp a spacing fixture to the rip fence to keep the fence from interfering with the saw guard or the stock being cut.

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Figure 2-41. To rip wide stock, mount the rip fence so it straddles the extension table and the worktable. The rip fence accurately guides the stock.

Ripping Wide Stock

If you're ripping stock that is 5-1/2" to 8-1/2" wide (Model 500) and 8-3/4" to 10-3/4" wide (Model 510), you can mount the rip fence so it straddles the extension table and the worktable. Be sure that the extension table and the worktable and rip fence are properly aligned, then slide the power plant and carriage to the right so that the worktable butts against the extension table. Position the rip fence so the saw blade is the desired distance from the rip fence and make fine adjustments with the quill feed. As you feed the stock, the rip fence will accurately guide the stock (Figure 2-41).

Ripping Large Stock

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Figure 2-42. A support table ne/ps support large stock at the outfeed end of the worktable.

Whenever you need to rip large pieces of stock such as plywood, paneling and other sheet materials it is very important that the stock be properly supported throughout the cut. Also, get a helper if the material you're ripping is too large to safely handle by yourself. There are several setups that provide the proper support.

One setup for ripping sheet materials is to mount an extension table on one or both sides of the machine, then mount the rip fence on the extension table.

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Figure 2-43. The Model 510 extension table system supports wide stock.

You can also mount a support table (Figure 2-42) or use a roller stand at the outfeed end of the worktable. For even more support, also use a support table (Model 510 only) or roller stand at the infeed end of the worktable. With the Model 510, you can also use the extension table system (Figure 2-43).

Ripping Long Stock
When ripping long stock it is extremely important to support the stock during the cut. Warning: If the stock is too long to safely handle by yourself get a helper to assist you.

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Figure 2-44. Use a support table when ripping long stock.

One way to support the stock is to mount a support table to the outfeed end of the worktable (Figure 2-44) or position a roller stand 1' to 4' away from the outfeed end of the worktable (Figure 2-45). You may also want to position a roller stand at the infeed end of the worktable. If the stock is extremely long (over 6'), you will want to use a roller stand positioned 2' to 4' beyond the support table (Figure 2-46). On the Model 510 you can mount a second support table at the infeed end of the worktable for extra support.

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Figure 2-45. A roller stand provides support for long stock.

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Figure 2-46. If the stock is extremely long, use a support table and two roller stands.

As you feed the stock, it comes off the outfeed end of the table and the support table and/or the roller stand will support it.

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Figure 2-47. Use a rip fence extension when ripping long and wide boards, and even plywood.

Figure 2-47 shows a rip fence extension that is used for ripping long and wide boards, and even plywood. To make the rip fence extension (Figure 2-48), use 3/4" plywood or clear straight hardwood. Drill and counterbore holes for the mounting bolts. Attach the support to the back with glue and screws. Mount 1-3/4" wide strips to the bottom edge for more support.

 

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Figure 2-48. Construction details of a rip fence extension. Click on image for larger view.

Sawing Stock with Irregular Edges

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Figure 2-49. Construction details of a guide used for ripping stock with irregular edges. Click on image for larger view.

Sometimes a piece of stock may not have an edge that is straight enough to be used against the rip fence. Maybe the piece has been cut on both edges with a jigsaw or bandsaw, or it might be uneven, rough lumber. These pieces of stock can be rip cut by the guide-strip method. A narrow, straight piece of stock is clamped or tack-nailed to the underside of the stock to be used as a guide. Or make a guide as shown in Figure 2-49.

 

 

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Figure 2-50. You can straighten stock with irregular edges by working this way. The guide rides against (A) the rip fence on the Model 510 and(B) against the edge of the table on the Model 500.

On the Model 510, mount the rip fence to the extension table and lower it until the top of the rip fence is flush with the top of the table. The guide will ride against the rip fence (Figure 2-50A). On the Model 500, the guide rides against the edge of the table (Figure 2-50B). Where you place the guide strip will determine how much of the irregular edge of the stock will be removed.

Since the worktable can be moved along the way tubes, some large-sized pieces of stock can be handled in this fashion.

Taper Ripping

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Figure 2-51. Construction details of a taper guide. Click on image for larger view.

Taper rip cuts, needed for many projects, call for a taper guide that has one straight side that can move along the rip fence and an adjustable side that can be locked at an angle to gauge the amount of taper. You can buy a taper guide or make one as shown in Figure 2-51. Surface-mount or mortise the hinge on the ends of the legs. The crosspiece, or brace, that is used to secure settings can be made of metal instead of wood.

 

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Figure 2-52. Mark across the legs 12" away from the hinged end; then you can measure between the marks to set the guide for a particular taper per foot.

After the guide is assembled, mark a line across both legs 12" away from the hinged end. Because of the 12" marks, you can preset the guide for particular tapers by measuring between the legs (Figure 2-52). For example, if you were making a stool with legs that are 12" long, 3" wide at the top, and 2" wide at the bottom, you would need to cut a 1" per foot taper. By separating the legs 1" at the 12" mark, you would have the correct setting for the guide to cut the taper on two adjacent sides only.

 

 

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Figure 2-53. You can calibrate the cross brace for particular taper-per-foot settings.

To provide a scale for future adjustments, separate the legs to various dimensions across the 12" marks and use a pencil to mark the settings on the cross brace (Figure 2-53).

When a project component, a table leg, for example, needs to be tapered on four sides, make one pass and then a second pass on an adjacent side of the stock without changing the guide's setting. Adjust the guide to twice the original setting and then make a third and fourth pass consecutively on the next adjacent sides.

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Figure 2-54. This is how the workpiece is placed in the taper guide. Place hands as you would for regular rip cuts. Be sure the guide rides against the fence throughout the pass.

Use a taper guide as shown in Figure 2-54. The workpiece is placed flush against the leg of the guide. Both the guide and the workpiece are then moved forward to make the cut. Notice that the worktable is positioned at the right end and lined up with the extension table to increase the work-piece support area. The operation is done just like a routine rip cut. The only difference is that the workpiece is fed forward by moving the guide.

 

 

 

 

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Figure 2-55. When you require the same taper on opposite edges, reposition the workpiece, set the guide for twice the originaltaper, and make a second pass.

When the same taper is required on the opposite side of the stock, make the first cut as just described; then adjust the guide to twice its original opening. Position the stock so the edge already tapered is against the guide, and make a second pass (Figure 2-55).

Other Tapering Techniques--The step guide, diagrammed in Figure 2-56, is a good aid for production-type work because it eliminates having to set the variable guide for different tapers. The steps in the guide, which are dimensioned for particular cuts, gauge the amount of taper. Each step will consistently produce the same taper. The work is placed so that one corner is in the correct step and the opposite end butts against the arm of the guide. The straight edge of the guide rides against the rip fence. against the rip fence.

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Figure 2-56. A step guide is a good aid if you do production work and will frequently be needing a particular taper. Click on image for larger view.

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Back to Crosscutting

 

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